Watch Modding

Everything you need to know about Seiko Watch Modding

This post will cover everything you will need to know about watch modding and where to purchase the parts and tools necessary to be able to either mod your existing Seiko or completely make your own with aftermarket parts.

This post will cover everything you will need to know about watch modding and where to purchase the parts and tools necessary to be able to either mod your existing Seiko or completely make your own with aftermarket parts.

Table of Contents

  1. Changing the Strap/Bracelet (1/5 Difficulty)
  2. Changing the Bezel/Bezel Insert (2/5 Difficulty)
  3. Changing the Caseback and Rotor of the Movement (2/5 Difficulty)
  4. Changing the Crystal (3/5 Difficulty)
  5. Changing the Hands of the SKX007 (4/5 Difficulty)
  6. Changing the Dial of the SKX007 (5/5 Difficulty)
  7. Upgrading the Movement and Changing the Crown (5/5 Difficulty)
  8. Changing the Case of the SKX007 (5/5 Difficulty)
  9. Where to Buy Tools
  10. Where to Buy Parts
  11. Great Resources to Learn From or Gain Inspiration
  12. Conclusion

The tools you need:

Depending on how extensive you want your modding procedure to be I will just cover the tools I have used from simple mods to a brand-new build with aftermarket parts.

An easy way to get the majority of the tools you need for watch modding is to buy a watch repair set from Amazon, these come at a very cheap price usually between $15 to $20. In these sets you can get some screwdrivers, a spring bar tool, caseback remover and tweezers. Which is more than enough to realise whether this hobby is actually for you or not without spending a serious amount of money on much better tools down the line.

At the end of each guide I will highlight the tools you will need per mod so you can make sure to only get the tools you will need depending on the mod you want to do for your watch.

Changing the Strap/Bracelet (1/5 Difficulty)

The easiest mod from this guide and also gives a very noticeable change in appearance, the choice of picking a strap is entirely dependant on the lug width. The lug is the part that holds the strap or bracelet, you can easily just google the model number for your watch and lug width afterwards to find the strap size you need.  That saves the hustle most of the time rather than using a specific tool to measure the lug width yourself. For the SKX007 it is 22mm, so when you are purchasing a strap/bracelet you have to make sure the lug width is 22mm, as if it is smaller it will slide around the spring bar, and if it is too big then it just won’t fit. There are several styles of straps/bracelets so this is really all dependant on how you want to style it. You can check out here where I go in depth with all the types of straps you can buy.

To change the strap you can use the spring bar tool to pull out the spring bar slightly from the end of the strap where it is connected to the lug and simply pry it away from the lug and it should just come out. To attach the new strap depending on what you get sometimes you can get the quick-strap feature on your strap which allows you to change and replace your straps without the use the spring bar tool. It is very easily identifiable as it has a little notch on the underside of the strap as to where it is connected to the lug and you can just use your hands to pull it away from the lug to remove or insert the strap. If you are wanting to change straps constantly then to make it easier on yourself and save some time and effort make sure the feature is available.

Video to watch:

Tools needed:

Spring Bar Tool:

You can get one from this Amazon pack here.

Bergeon 6767-F Watch Spring Bar Tool

Springbar Pliers Tool

Changing the Bezel/Bezel Insert (2/5 Difficulty)

One of the easier mods for the SKX007 and requires only a few tools to complete the mod.

Firstly, the difference between bezel and bezel insert is necessary to know as they are two separate parts and most of the time you have to purchase them individually. The bezel is the part the actually rotates around the crystal, while the insert is simply the piece stuck on top that has all the indications on it.

*I prefer to remove the strap/bracelet first as it makes it easier to move and work on the watch.

Choosing a bezel and bezel insert is really your choice as it just will depend on how you want the look of the watch to be. One thing to note, is making sure to pick right type of bezel insert, whether it is a slope or flat bezel insert. As this will depend on how it protrudes out from the crystal, if you have not changed the crystal of your watch and it has the flat crystal, then buy a flat insert. If you have a double domed sapphire crystal, then get a sloped insert as it will match the look a lot better. Another thing to note is the bezel gasket, these are usually pre-installed if that’s the case then you do not have to worry about it, but if it does not you need to purchase this separately.

To remove the bezel you will need either a caseback knife or a specific bezel opener. Either one will do the trick. Simply wedge the tool in between the case and the bezel and pop it upwards and it should simply come off. One thing to note, since the bezel opener is usually made out of metal, you could scratch the case when doing this procedure if not careful. I like to use a piece of cloth in between the tool and the case to avoid any scratches on the case, but you can also use electrical tape.

Once you have removed the bezel, removing the bezel insert can be done simply using a pair of tweezers or flat head screwdriver as it is usually just held with some adhesive. Keep in mind the bezel click spring as you will need that part reinstalled otherwise the bezel will not spin properly.

If it does not come with the bezel gasket pre-installed, then you will have to buy one and also purchase silicon grease pad or silicon grease by itself. Place the bezel gasket in the grease pad turn it slighty left and right and then using a pair of tweezers fit it in the groove inside the bezel and make sure it is fitted properly.

To put the bezel back on the watch you can use the crystal press, as you can use the nylon dies to push in the bezel, however you can just use your hands to do it. My personal preference is to use the press as it applies even pressure all around so the bezel is inserted properly but it is not necessary. Make sure before you do push the bezel you put the click spring back in place as it has two holes that match underneath and it should just fit right in those two notches. When you do press the bezel, you will hear a very audible click this indicates that the bezel has been installed, see if it turns clockwise properly and that it is seated flush against the case on all sides.

For the bezel insert, depending on where you purchase it you will normally get 3M double sided tape to help stick it to the bezel. However, before putting the bezel insert on the bezel make sure you clean any adhesive residue from the previous bezel insert and make sure it is completely clean. You can use a knife or a screwdriver to remove the excess adhesive to make it nice and clean before pasting the other adhesive. Align the bezel insert with the 12 o’clock marker on the dial and press down and that is it you have completed the mod.

Video to watch:

Tools needed:

Bezel Opener:

Case opener knife and flathead screwdriver from Amazon here.

Bergeon 4932 Watch Case Knife Caseback & Bezel Opener

Bezel Opener Tool

Tweezers:

Tweezers from Amazon here.

Bergeon 7024 Anti Magnetic Tweezers #3

Flathead screwdriver

From Amazon here.

Optional:

Grease pad (this is only needed if you need to buy a bezel gasket separately for your bezel):

Watch Gasket O-Ring Lubricator Silicone Grease

Bergeon 7055 Lubri-Gaskets with Silicone Grease

Watchmakers Seiko Brand TSF451 Silicone Watch Grease

Crystal Press (Not needed for this mod unless you are having difficulty pressing in the bezel with just your hands):

For this tool you can get either a very cheap option from eBay which was my first purchase and I would definitely not recommend it however your mileage may vary. These are some of the crystal presses that I would personally recommend.

Watch Press Set Watchmaker Tool 18-50mm Crystal Glass Back Case Closer

Watch Tool Crystal Press and Case Back Press with Nylon Dies

Gloves, rubber or latex gloves, while gloves are really not necessary for this mod it is good practice to have them on:

A popular option is finger cots which you can get from here:

100 Pieces Rubber Finger Cots Elastic Guards Medium Size

Changing the Caseback and Rotor of the Movement (2/5 Difficulty)

Changing the caseback of the watch you just have to make sure that it matches the case of the watch. You can get a display window so you can see the automatic movement of the watch, and if you want to improve the look since the 7s26 movement does not particularly have a beautiful rotor so you can change it up so you can have the exhibition window and a rotor to go with it.

Purchasing a rotor you also need to make sure that it matches the existing movement otherwise it will be of no avail and you would have bought a part not at all compatible with your current movement. Once you have purchased the rotor and the new caseback it is a very simple mod to do.

*I prefer to remove the strap/bracelet first as it makes it easier to move and work on the watch.

First step is to remove the caseback of the watch, which you have to use a caseback opener.

For this I use the caseback remover that I received with the repair set from amazon. Simply align the tool with the notches on the SKX007 caseback and turn to the left to unscrew it.

**Remember to wear gloves from this point onwards normal rubber or latex gloves should be fine or you can use finger cots, this is to prevent any smudges and also to protect the movement**

Once you remove the caseback then you will have the automatic movement exposed and then you have to use a flathead screwdriver right at the centre to remove the rotor. Make sure you are holding the screwdriver perfectly straight up and then slowly unscrew it. Once it is unscrewed enough you just have to pull it off using a tweezer carefully, make sure to only hold the rotor by the tweezers. Then take your new rotor place it right it in the middle using the tweezers and screw it using the flathead screwdriver make sure not to overtighten it and just screw in until it stops and that should be enough. Use the toothpick and make sure it spins freely around the movement. Then use your new caseback and screw it back into the case and that is it. You are done with the mod and now you have a new caseback as well as a new rotor.

Video to watch:

Tools Needed:

Gloves, rubber or latex gloves a popular option is finger cots which you can get from here:

100 Pieces Rubber Finger Cots Elastic Guards Medium Size

Caseback Opener:

Caseback Opener from Amazon here.

Tweezers:

Tweezers from Amazon here.

Bergeon 7024 Anti Magnetic Tweezers #3

Flathead screwdriver:

Flathead Screwdriver from Amazon here.

You can use the very specific screwdriver made for this mod specifically:

DIY Watch Club – Tailor-made CNC-machined Watch Screwdrivers for Miyota & Seiko Rotor

Changing the Crystal (3/5 Difficulty)

This is arguably one of the most popular mod people tend to do with their SKX, as not only can you give your watch a completely different look, but also can upgrade it from Hardlex to a sapphire crystal. The reason sapphire crystal is set as the highest standard for watch crystals is due to the scratch resistance. Sapphire Crystals measure 9 on the Mohs Scale, which in very simple terms one of the only materials that can scratch a sapphire crystal is a diamond.

Before removing the hardlex crystal, you have to pick which crystal you want the watch to have as there are different styles and AR coating which could all have significant impacts on the final look and the type of bezel insert will also come into the equation. However, due to the popularity of Seiko modding in recent years it is easier than ever before to find the right part and get a good idea before committing to a crystal.

*Always keep in mind whether you have a flat bezel insert or a sloped bezel insert. Simply just check if the bezel seems to slope down from the crystal or does it remain flat all the way through from one end to the other.

Double Domed Sapphire Crystal

The most common form of sapphire crystal especially for the SKX is the doubled domed crystal. There are two types to a doubled domed sapphire crystal one is with a bevel edge and the other is without a bevel edge. The bevel edge means that right where the crystal meets the bezel insert there is a slight raised edge, while the crystal without a bevel edge gives it a seamless transition from the crystal to the bezel without any gaps or raised edges.

Another variant to be aware of is the low double domed crystal, since the earlier variants sit higher than the OEM bezel inserts (OEM means that it comes originally from the manufacturer in this case Seiko), this low double domed crystal is the best choice if you are simply just wanting to upgrade the stock hardlex crystal of the original SKX and 5 Sports watches to a double domed sapphire crystal.

Top Hat Sapphire Crystal

If you are wanting to make your watch have a more of a vintage look, the top hat crystal would be the way to go, as the name suggests it is a tall, rounded silhouette that protrudes out from the bezel.

Flat Sapphire Crystal

If you are wanting to keep the exact same original look of your SKX007 the flat crystal is the easiest way to go, as it will keep the original look of the watch but with the added upgrade of it being a sapphire crystal.

Now with that all out of the way finally the steps in removing and replacing the crystal of the SKX007.

First step is to remove the caseback of the watch, which you have to use a caseback opener.

For this I use the caseback remover that I received with the repair set from amazon. Simply align the tool with the notches on the SKX007 caseback and turn to the left to unscrew it.

*I prefer to remove the strap/bracelet first as it makes it easier to move and inspect the watch as I go through the process of removing the crystal.

**Remember to wear gloves from this point onwards normal rubber or latex gloves should be fine or you can use finger cots, this is to prevent any smudges and also to protect the movement, dial and hands**

Once you remove the caseback then you will have the automatic movement exposed, and before you can remove the movement you have to remove the stem. The stem is attached to the crown which is what you use to set the time and date of your watch. To remove the stem, simply unscrew the crown to its first position (Make sure the stem is not in the time setting or date setting position, as during that position the setting lever will not be accessible) and using your tweezers or a toothpick push down on the setting lever as the picture shows and pull out the stem as you are pushing down and it should come out relatively easily. If the rotor is above the setting lever, move it out of the way using a toothpick, or just turn the watch away from the stem and the rotor should rotate to the other side.

Then carefully set it down on the soft gel watch case casing cushion, if it does not come out use the toothpick and very slowly and carefully around the outer edge simply pull out the movement a little and it should come out. Lay it down on the gel cushion or a clean surface and it will come out of the case quite easily.  

Once you have the movement out along with the dial and hands, set it aside along with the crown and stem and preferably cover it so you can prevent dust from accumulating on the dial.

Now that you have the case without the dial and movement you can finally replace the crystal using the crystal setter tool.

For the next steps it is better explained through a video than text, and one of the best videos I have seen is Long Island Watch’s tutorial of upgrading the crystal of a SKX007 here:

In that video you will note how it snaps in when it is being replaced, this is definitely not always the case, and it is better to push slightly turn it around the nylon die and then push slightly again. As it applies even pressure all around and you can make sure that you are placing the crystal evenly as if it is not, you have to remove the crystal and start the process all over again.

When you are placing the dial and movement back inside the case, use a dust blower quickly to get rid of any dust particles that may have accumulated on the surface, as well as the back of the crystal in the case. Once you are certain there is no visible dust or smudges underneath the crystal and the dial place it and it should just fit back in place. Keep in mind where the stem meets with the movement as you place.

When placing the stem back into the watch, it does not require a lot of force it should have the feeling of just being clicked in. If it doesn’t set in properly simply pull it out and retry it might take a few tries but it should always click in. Check if you can change the time and date and if that is all good you can screw in the crown, and the caseback and you are officially done with a crystal mod.

Tools Needed:

Gloves, rubber or latex gloves, while gloves are really not necessary for this mod it is good practice to have them on:

A popular option is finger cots which you can get from here:

100 Pieces Rubber Finger Cots Elastic Guards Medium Size

Caseback Opener:

Caseback Opener from Amazon here.

Crystal Press:

For this tool you can get either a very cheap option from eBay which was my first purchase and I would definitely not recommend it however your mileage may vary. These are some of the crystal presses that I would personally recommend.

Watch Press Set Watchmaker Tool 18-50mm Crystal Glass Back Case Closer

Watch Tool Crystal Press and Case Back Press with Nylon Dies

I prefer the red one from eBay as it is a much simpler application as you simply just have to screw down instead of pushing it with the lever with the other variants.

Optional:

Dust Blower (You can buy any cheap one you find, they all do the same job):

Economy Dust Blower Rubber 5 x 2 Inches

Watch Cushion:

Bergeon 5395-55 Soft Gel Watch Case Casing Cushion

Dust cover with tray, very handy to use and very cheap as well:

Dust Cover with Tray

If you have a nice clean surface with a way to cover the dial you can use that too it is more for safety and cleanliness that I have added the optional tools needed above.

Changing the Hands of the SKX007 (4/5 Difficulty)

This mod requires a lot of tools and great precision and a very steady hand, which quite understandably is not a popular choice for modding. First thing you would need to do is understand what hands are compatible with your watch, which is actually dependant on the movement of the watch. Now for the SKX007 which I am basing this guide off you have to find hands compatible with the 7s26. Hands made for the 7s26 are actually compatible with a wide range of movements from Seiko (7S26, 7S36, 4R15, 4R35, 4R36, 6R15, NE15, NH25, NH26, NH35, NH36, NH37, NH38, NH39, NH70, NH71, NH72).

First step is to remove the caseback of the watch, which you have to use a caseback opener.

For this I use the caseback remover that I received with the repair set from amazon. Simply align the tool with the notches on the SKX007 caseback and turn to the left to unscrew it.

*I prefer to remove the strap/bracelet first as it makes it easier to move and work on the watch.

**Remember to wear gloves from this point onwards normal rubber or latex gloves should be fine or you can use finger cots, this is to prevent any smudges and also to protect the movement, dial and hands**

Once you remove the caseback then you will have the automatic movement exposed, and before you can remove the movement you have to remove the stem. The stem is attached to the crown which is what you use to set the time and date of your watch. To remove the stem, simply unscrew the crown to its first position (Make sure the stem is not in the time setting or date setting position, as during that position the setting lever will not be accessible) and using your tweezers or a toothpick push down on the setting lever as the picture shows and pull out the stem as you are pushing down and it should come out relatively easily. If the rotor is above the setting lever, move it out of the way using a toothpick, or just turn the watch away from the stem and the rotor should rotate to the other side.

Keep the case someplace safe preferably covered so dust particles do not accumulate underneath the crystal. Now place the movement with the dial and hands in a movement holder and place the stem and crown back into the movement. Once you do pull out the crown into the time setting position and change the time so that the hour, minute and second hands are aligned together in the same line. Use a dial protector and slowly wedge it in between the hands and the dial to protect the dial from any scratches. There are two ways to remove the hands and that is just based on the tool you will buy for the mod. I use the watch hand remover that I got from Namoki as it just pulls out all the hands effortlessly. Simply line it up over the hands and align the centre of the tool over the middle where the hands are attached to the movement and press the sides of the tool and it should just pop out the hands. Use tweezers to move the hands away and be very careful as they are quite fragile and if you want to use them later careful not to scratch them.

To replace with new hands first use the crown and, in the time setting position turn the crown until the date changes. This indicates that the hour hand reached midnight or the 12 o’clock position. Here you can use the tweezers again or if you want to be safer use Rodico as there is a less chance of the hands being scratched with the tweezers. Now with the hand setting tool depending on what type you get you have to make sure the end matches the hand you are pressing down on to the movement. As the holes at the tip determine how much to push down on to the movement. The hour hands will require a bigger hole at the tip while the second hand will require the smallest as it rests right at the top above every other hand. When you line up the hour hand simply press down slowly with little pressure until it sets properly, too much pressure can cause it to bend or set in the wrong position. Then I like to move the hour hand using the crown and see if it moves around properly and there is enough clearance between the dial and the hand and also to see if the date changes right as the hour hand goes to the 12 o’clock position. You can also use a loupe to manually check this just to be sure that there is enough clearance and that it has set properly.

Once you have the hour hand lined up at the 12 o’clock position, repeat the same process for the minute hand and make sure it aligns perfectly with the hour hand and the 12 o’clock position and press down with the hand setting tool. Manually inspect it with the loupe and turn the time around until the date changes and make sure the hour and minute hands are in line with each other when the date changes. The second hand does not need to be aligned with the other hands as it is constantly turning. So, place the second hand whichever way it is easier for you and use the smallest tip with the hand setting tool and press it on. The second hand is the hardest one as it rests on a tiny pinion that comes out right at the top. Usually when placing it you can feel it as it rests on top of it before you press down, or you can use the loupe and see just as you are placing it and make sure it lands right at the correct spot. Press down slightly and that is it you officially changed the hands of your watch. Now I like using the movement holder as it allows me to flip it around and remove the crown and stem easily without too much trouble. Then place the dial and movement back inside the case. Use a dust blower on both the inside of the case as well as the dial to ensure there are no dust particles left on the dial or the underneath of the case.

Simply place it back inside the case minding where the stem and crown gets attached to the movement, reattach the stem and crown and use the caseback remover to seal the caseback on properly and you are all done.

Video to watch:

Tools Needed:

Gloves, rubber or latex gloves, while gloves are really not necessary for this mod it is good practice to have them on:

A popular option is finger cots which you can get from here:

100 Pieces Rubber Finger Cots Elastic Guards Medium Size

Caseback Opener:

Caseback Opener from Amazon here.

Tweezers:

Tweezers from Amazon here.

Bergeon 7024 Anti Magnetic Tweezers #3

Watch Hand Remover:

Watch Hand Remover

Watch Hand Removing Pry Levers Pair

Tweezers for Hands Specifically:

Vetus® High Precision Tweezer with Carbon Fibre Tip

Bergeon 7026 Watch Hands Installing Tweezer

Rodico used for cleaning but can be used to install hands safely:

Bergeon 6033 Rodico Cleaning Putty

Hand Press Tool:

Stella Euro Watch Hand Press Inserting Tool

Hand Setting Tool (Set of 3)

Dial Protectors (You can use plastic sheets, bags whatever you can find really as long as it does not scratch the dial):

Bergeon 6938 Dial Protectors (Pack of 3)

Movement Holder:

SEIKO Movement Holder

Optional:

Toothpick

Dust Blower (You can buy any cheap one you find, they all do the same job):

Economy Dust Blower Rubber 5 x 2 Inches

Loupe (while not necessary it is a good option to have to check if everything is in place correctly):

Bergeon 2611-TN Watchmaker Loupe with Opening

Magnifier Loupe with Headband for Watchmaking and Jewelry

Changing the Dial of the SKX007 (5/5 Difficulty)

Changing the dial essentially has similar steps to changing the hands of the watch as it requires you to remove and reinstall the hands again as it is impossible to change the dial without doing so. Choosing a dial is dependant on the case as well as the movement. You have to purchase a dial that is both compatible with the case and the movement. What I mean by the movement is say in case you purchase a dial with a day and date window, but your movement only has a date function then that dial will not work. For the SKX007 the dial size is 28.5mm which is a very common size for modding and you have a huge range available from a variety of sellers.

First step is to remove the caseback of the watch, which you have to use a caseback opener.

For this I use the caseback remover that I received with the repair set from amazon. Simply align the tool with the notches on the SKX007 caseback and turn to the left to unscrew it.

*I prefer to remove the strap/bracelet first as it makes it easier to move and work on the watch.

**Remember to wear gloves from this point onwards normal rubber or latex gloves should be fine or you can use finger cots, this is to prevent any smudges and also to protect the movement, dial and hands**

Once you remove the caseback then you will have the automatic movement exposed, and before you can remove the movement you have to remove the stem. The stem is attached to the crown which is what you use to set the time and date of your watch. To remove the stem, simply unscrew the crown to its first position (Make sure the stem is not in the time setting or date setting position, as during that position the setting lever will not be accessible) and using your tweezers or a toothpick push down on the setting lever as the picture shows and pull out the stem as you are pushing down and it should come out relatively easily. If the rotor is above the setting lever, move it out of the way using a toothpick, or just turn the watch away from the stem and the rotor should rotate to the other side.

Keep the case someplace safe preferably covered so dust particles do not accumulate underneath the crystal. Now place the movement with the dial and hands in a movement holder and place the stem and crown back into the movement. Once you do pull out the crown into the time setting position and change the time so that the hour, minute and second hands are aligned together in the same line. Use a dial protector and slowly wedge it in between the hands and the dial to protect the dial from any scratches. There are two ways to remove the hands and that is just based on the tool you will buy for the mod, its either a prying tool or a hand remover. I use the watch hand remover from Namoki as it just pulls out all the hands effortlessly. Simply line it up over the hands and align the centre of the tool over the middle where the hands are attached to the movement and press the sides of the tool and it should just pop out the hands. Use tweezers to move the hands away and be very careful as they are quite fragile and if you want to use them later careful not to scratch them.

Once you have the dial by itself attach to the movement without any hands, use a flathead screwdriver and place it in between the dial and the movement and pry it up and it should come off relatively easily. Now with the dial you purchase you will either have feet on the back of the dial or not. If there are feet on the back there is usually four different feet. You have to remove the feet that do not match the orientation for your crown position. So, if the crown is in the 3 o’clock position you have to remove certain two feet, and if the crown is in the 4 o’clock position you have to remove the other feet. To understand which feet to remove align the dial as is over the movement and see which feet will get into the holes at the outer ring of the movement according to the crown position. There are two holes you need to match, then you can use some pliers to remove the feet simply hold and rotate the dial and it should snap off. If there is a little bit remaining over the dial use a file to ensure that part is completely flat.

If your dial has no feet underneath you have to use adhesive or dial dots to stick it on the outer ring of the dial. You can use 3M double sided tape if they do not provide you with any and place it on the outer plastic ring of the movement, avoid putting any in the middle of the movement and do not let it hit the date wheel of the movement as it needs to spin freely without obstruction.

Once you have attached the dial over the movement you need to either put back your old hands back onto the movement or this is a great opportunity to replace the hands as well as this mod usually goes hand in hand with a dial replacement as usually the stock hands will not match the new dial of your choosing.

To place the hands on the movement and dial, pull out the crown in the time setting position turn the crown until the date changes. This indicates that the hour hand reached midnight or the 12 o’clock position. Here you can use the tweezers or if you want to be safer use Rodico as there is a less chance of the hands being scratched with the tweezers. Now with the hand setting tool depending on what type you get you have to make sure the end matches the hand you are pressing down on to the movement. As the holes at the tips determine how much to push down on to the movement. The hour hands will require a bigger hole at the tip while the second hand will require the smallest as it rests right at the top above every other hand. When you line up the hour hand simply press down slowly with little pressure until it sets properly, too much pressure can cause it to bend or set in the wrong position. Then I like to move the hour hand using the crown and see if it moves around properly and there is enough clearance between the dial and the hand and also to see if the date changes right as the hour hand goes to the 12 o’clock position. You can also use a loupe to manually check this just to be sure that there is enough clearance and that it has set properly.

Once you have the hour hand lined up at the 12 o’clock position, repeat the same process for the minute hand and make sure it aligns perfectly with the hour hand and the 12 o’clock position and press down with the hand setting tool. Manually inspect it with the loupe and turn the time around until the date changes and make sure the hour and minute hands are in line with each other when the date changes. The second hand does not need to be aligned with the other hands as it is constantly turning. So, place the second hand whichever way it is easier for you and use the smallest tip with the hand setting tool and press it on. The second hand is the hardest one as it rests on a tiny pinion that comes out right at the top. Usually when placing it you can feel it as it rests on top of it before you press down, or you can use the loupe and see just as you are placing it and make sure it lands right at the correct spot. Press down slightly and that is it you officially changed the hands of your watch. Now I like using the movement holder as it allows me to flip it around and remove the crown and stem easily without too much trouble. Then place the dial and movement back inside the case. Use a dust blower on both the inside of the case as well as the dial to ensure there are no dust particles left on the dial or the underneath of the case.

Simply place it back inside the case, reattach the stem and crown and use the caseback remover to seal the caseback on properly and you are all done.

Video to watch:

Tools Needed:

Gloves, rubber or latex gloves, while gloves are really not necessary for this mod it is good practice to have them on:

A popular option is finger cots which you can get from here:

100 Pieces Rubber Finger Cots Elastic Guards Medium Size

Caseback Opener:

Caseback Opener from Amazon here.

Tweezers:

Tweezers from Amazon here.

Bergeon 7024 Anti Magnetic Tweezers #3

Watch Hand Remover:

Watch Hand Remover

Watch Hand Removing Pry Levers Pair

Tweezers for Hands Specifically:

Vetus® High Precision Tweezer with Carbon Fibre Tip

Bergeon 7026 Watch Hands Installing Tweezer

Rodico used for cleaning but can be used to install hands safely:

Bergeon 6033 Rodico Cleaning Putty

Hand Press Tool:

Stella Euro Watch Hand Press Inserting Tool

Hand Setting Tool (Set of 3)

Dial Protectors (You can use plastic sheets, bags whatever you can find really as long as it does not scratch the dial):

Bergeon 6938 Dial Protectors (Pack of 3)

Movement Holder:

SEIKO Movement Holder

Pliers (Any would do, just to pull the feet off the dials if necessary)

File (Any would do from a hardware store)

Optional:

Toothpick

Dust Blower (You can buy any cheap one you find, they all do the same job):

Economy Dust Blower Rubber 5 x 2 Inches

Loupe (while not necessary it is a good option to have to check if everything is in place correctly):

Bergeon 2611-TN Watchmaker Loupe with Opening

Magnifier Loupe with Headband for Watchmaking and Jewelry

Upgrading the Movement and Changing the Crown (5/5 Difficulty)

Reason as to why you would do this mod and why it is considered an upgrade is because of the hacking feature and hand winding. Hacking means that when you pull the crown to the hand setting time the second hand will stop moving, and hand winding is when you pull the crown to the first position you can manually wind the watch to power it rather than shaking it to power it back again.

Doing this mod is quite complicated and really does not provide another benefit besides adding those two features, so if you are concerned about the look of your watch this mod will do nothing, however if you want to upgrade the movement for those features then this mod makes sense.

Upgrades for the 7s26 include the 4R36 or NH36 movement. The NH36 is a much more accessible movement as you can purchase it from a variety of sellers online. Depending on the seller sometimes they will add the stem as well but this is not always the case so make sure as they usually specify in the description if they do. Now with upgrading the movement the stem of the old movement will not be compatible which also does mean normally you have to buy a new crown. This crown can match your current one or you can actually change its look and fit it into the new stem.

Once you have the new movement, and the new stem and crown you can finally begin the upgrade. First step is to remove the caseback of the watch, which you have to use a caseback opener. For this I use the caseback remover that I received with the repair set from amazon. Simply align the tool with the notches on the SKX007 caseback and turn to the left to unscrew it.

*I prefer to remove the strap/bracelet first as it makes it easier to move and work on the watch.

**Remember to wear gloves from this point onwards normal rubber or latex gloves should be fine or you can use finger cots, this is to prevent any smudges and also to protect the movement, dial and hands**

Once you remove the caseback then you will have the automatic movement exposed, and before you can remove the movement you have to remove the stem. The stem is attached to the crown which is what you use to set the time and date of your watch. To remove the stem, simply unscrew the crown to its first position (Make sure the stem is not in the time setting or date setting position, as during that position the setting lever will not be accessible) and using your tweezers or a toothpick push down on the setting lever as the picture shows and pull out the stem as you are pushing down and it should come out relatively easily. If the rotor is above the setting lever, move it out of the way using a toothpick, or just turn the watch away from the stem and the rotor should rotate to the other side.

Keep the case someplace safe preferably covered so dust particles do not accumulate underneath the crystal. Now place the movement with the dial and hands in a movement holder and place the stem and crown back into the movement. Once you do pull out the crown into the time setting position and change the time so that the hour, minute and second hands are aligned together in the same line. Use a dial protector and slowly wedge it in between the hands and the dial to protect the dial from any scratches. There are two ways to remove the hands and that is just based on the tool you will buy for the mod, its either a prying tool or a hand remover. I use the watch hand remover from Namoki as it just pulls out all the hands effortlessly. Simply line it up over the hands and align the centre of the tool over the middle where the hands are attached to the movement and press the sides of the tool and it should just pop out the hands. Use tweezers to move the hands away and be very careful as they are quite fragile and if you want to use them later careful not to scratch them.

Once you have the dial by itself attach to the movement without any hands, use a flathead screwdriver or tweezers and place it in between the dial and the movement and pry it up and it should come off relatively easily. Now with the dial you removed from the old movement the feet might not always match the new movement, so you might have to remove the feet and use dial dots or adhesive to place it on the movement. Use some pliers to remove the feet simply hold and rotate the dial and it should snap off. If there is a little bit remaining over the dial use a file to ensure that part is completely flat. Keep the dial aside and now focus on the NH35/NH36 movement. The difference between NH35 and NH36 is that NH35 only has a date wheel while the NH36 has a date and day wheel. So, if your watch dial has both the day and date window you need the NH36. This is also where it gets a bit more complicated. I recommend personally getting the NH36 as it is usually the same price and you have the extra benefit of having a day wheel in case you do want to use the movement later down the line for another mod.

Depending on the case it might be necessary to replace the spacer. On the NH36 it comes with a grey spacer around the movement which you have to use a small screwdriver to remove it, there are two screws to remove and once you do you have to take out the spacer from the old movement and attach it on the NH36. Now if you want to have the same date and day wheel as the old movement, you might want to do this depending on the colour and crown position. As if the crown is on the 4 o’clock position then the day window will need to be changed to match the 4 o’clock position. Removing the date and day wheel is a lot more complicated and finicky. When you see the movement right where the pinion is you have to remove the little c clip above the day wheel, keep in mind this part loves to fly off and disappear never to be found again, so be very careful when prying it up. After that c clip comes off you can very easily remove the day wheel with some tweezers, once you do to remove the day wheel you need to remove another four screws. This requires a lot of patience and carefulness as you are dealing directly with the components of the movement. Once you remove the four screws, the part that comes off makes it very easy for the date wheel to come off as that part holds the date jumper that holds the date wheel in place. Now you have to repeat the same process on the new movement as you are replacing the date and day wheels to have the original wheels.

Now when you put in the new date wheel, when you put that part with the date jumper make sure to place it carefully and accurately. Ensure the date jumper is in between the notches for the date wheel, and then screw back the four screws. Now place the day wheel and turn it around slowly until it feels as if it clips back in place. Now take the small c clip and place it back on the pinion and pin it down on the day wheel and that will hold it perfectly. Now using the crown check if the date wheel and day wheel change appropriately. Once that is all done. You can finally put in the dial and hands.

If your dial has no feet underneath you have to use adhesive or dial dots to stick it on the outer ring of the dial. You can use 3M double sided tape if they do not provide you with any and place it on the outer plastic ring of the movement, avoid putting any in the middle of the movement and do not let it hit the date wheel of the movement as it needs to spin freely without obstruction.

Once you have attached the dial over the movement you need to either put back your old hands back onto the movement or this is a great opportunity to replace the hands as well as this mod usually goes hand in hand with a dial replacement as usually the stock hands will not match the new dial of your choosing.

To place the hands on the movement and dial, pull out the crown in the time setting position turn the crown until the date changes. This indicates that the hour hand reached midnight or the 12 o’clock position. Here you can use the tweezers or if you want to be safer use Rodico as there is a less chance of the hands being scratched with the tweezers. Now with the hand setting tool depending on what type you get you have to make sure the end matches the hand you are pressing down on to the movement. As the holes at the tips determine how much to push down on to the movement. The hour hands will require a bigger hole at the tip while the second hand will require the smallest as it rests right at the top above every other hand. When you line up the hour hand simply press down slowly with little pressure until it sets properly, too much pressure can cause it to bend or set in the wrong position. Then I like to move the hour hand using the crown and see if it moves around properly and there is enough clearance between the dial and the hand and also to see if the date changes right as the hour hand goes to the 12 o’clock position. You can also use a loupe to manually check this just to be sure that there is enough clearance and that it has set properly.

Once you have the hour hand lined up at the 12 o’clock position, repeat the same process for the minute hand and make sure it aligns perfectly with the hour hand and the 12 o’clock position and press down with the hand setting tool. Manually inspect it with the loupe and turn the time around until the date changes and make sure the hour and minute hands are in line with each other when the date changes. The second hand does not need to be aligned with the other hands as it is constantly turning. So, place the second hand whichever way it is easier for you and use the smallest tip with the hand setting tool and press it on. The second hand is the hardest one as it rests on a tiny pinion that comes out right at the top. Usually when placing it you can feel it as it rests on top of it before you press down, or you can use the loupe and see just as you are placing it and make sure it lands right at the correct spot. Press down slightly and that is it you officially changed the hands of your watch. Now I like using the movement holder as it allows me to flip it around and remove the crown and stem easily without too much trouble. Then place the dial and movement back inside the case. Use a dust blower on both the inside of the case as well as the dial to ensure there are no dust particles left on the dial or the underneath of the case.

Now when it is inside the case this is when you have to use the new stem and crown to adjust manually the size, as the stem you buy will be a lot longer than what is needed and so you will have to cut down and file as you eventually come down to the right size. The crown is simply screwed on the end of the stem. Hold the stem with some pliers or pin vice and make sure when you hold it is it by the thread and not towards the end of the stem where it meets the movement. Screw in the crown place it back in and see how much you need to cut. Do not overestimate how much, instead do it bit by bit so you do not cut it too short by accident as in that case you will have to buy a new stem. Use a end cutter to cut down the stem and file the end a little bit and see, once you get the perfect size where you are able to wind it in it’s first position and you are able to screw down back into the case without leaving a significant gap. Then you have to remove the stem again and unscrew the crown. This time however, you are not cutting down anymore or filing instead you are applying Loctite or threadlock on the end of the stem where the crown meets, this is a definite measure of making sure the crown will never come off the stem. You only need a little bit, and then screw the crown back on wipe off the excess and leave it for a bit. Then put it back in the case into the movement, ensure everything works such as changing the time and day and date. Once you are happy and everything is functioning, install the caseback and the strap and you are officially done with the mod.

Videos to watch:

Tools Needed:

Gloves, rubber or latex gloves, while gloves are really not necessary for this mod it is good practice to have them on:

A popular option is finger cots which you can get from here:

100 Pieces Rubber Finger Cots Elastic Guards Medium Size

Caseback Opener:

Caseback Opener from Amazon here.

Tweezers:

Tweezers from Amazon here.

Bergeon 7024 Anti Magnetic Tweezers #3

Watch Hand Remover:

Watch Hand Remover

Watch Hand Removing Pry Levers Pair

Tweezers for Hands Specifically:

Vetus® High Precision Tweezer with Carbon Fibre Tip

Bergeon 7026 Watch Hands Installing Tweezer

Rodico used for cleaning but can be used to install hands safely:

Bergeon 6033 Rodico Cleaning Putty

Hand Press Tool:

Stella Euro Watch Hand Press Inserting Tool

Hand Setting Tool (Set of 3)

Dial Protectors (You can use plastic sheets, bags whatever you can find really as long as it does not scratch the dial):

Bergeon 6938 Dial Protectors (Pack of 3)

Movement Holder:

SEIKO Movement Holder

Pliers (Any would do, just to pull the feet off the dials if necessary, this can be used instead of a pin vice as well)

File (Any would do from a hardware store)

End Cutter(Any would do from a hardware store)

Pin Vice:

Double Ended Pin Vise and Collet Tool 0 to 1.0mm and 1.8 to 2.5mm

Loctite/Hypo Cement (you can just go to your local hardware store and buy any of the options they have as long as its purpose is to lock threaded fasterners):

Loctite Threadlocker 242 Blue 6 mL Medium Adhesive

Optional:

Toothpick

Dust Blower (You can buy any cheap one you find, they all do the same job):

Economy Dust Blower Rubber 5 x 2 Inches

Loupe (while not necessary it is a good option to have to check if everything is in place correctly):

Bergeon 2611-TN Watchmaker Loupe with Opening

Magnifier Loupe with Headband for Watchmaking and Jewelry

Changing the Case of the SKX007 (5/5 Difficulty)

This mod has a huge impact on the look of your watch and requires a few parts but you will not have to change the dial, hands or movement. If you are thinking of changing the dial, hands or movement then this mod would also go hand in hand as this means you are making a full aftermarket swap of everything. However, depending on the case, you might have to buy a new stem and attach it to the crown. For the purpose of this guide, I will include the fact that you have to buy a new stem and also getting a new crown to match the case.

When picking a case, the most important thing to look out for is that you buy a case that fits your movement and dial. Also, dependant on where you purchase the case from sometimes you will have to put in the crystal which means you have to buy the crystal separately as well. Some case options will no longer have a bezel so you have to make sure whether it requires a bezel or not. If you want to save the hassle and avoid buying a crystal, crystal gasket and chapter ring. Buying a premade case saves you purchasing a crystal, crystal gasket and chapter ring, otherwise you have to put in the crystal yourself. A lot of times the case does not include a caseback so you have to purchase this separately as well, just be aware of these items you may have to buy individually.

**Remember to wear gloves from this point onwards normal rubber or latex gloves should be fine or you can use finger cots, this is to prevent any smudges and also to protect the movement, dial and hands**

Now with the new case in hand, first step is to prepare it before you move everything from your old watch. With the case first thing to do is put in the new crystal if it does not come attached. Skip this section if your case already has the crystal preinstalled. Put in the chapter ring from the top of the case and rotate it around until it stops moving around, this is usually for chapter rings with a minute track sometimes they do not have any notch underneath so be aware that it might not need to be slotted in. Then using the tweezers place the crystal gasket in the notch between where the crystal is placed and the case. It is thin flat circular gasket so be careful not to bend it or damage it.

Now screw in the caseback slightly with just your hands so you can place it on the nylon die for the crystal press. Then place the crystal you have bought on top of the watch and make sure it is even before you use the crystal press to press it down. Ensure the nylon die above the crystal press is roughly almost the same size as the crystal so it applies even pressure all around the edge of the crystal. When pressing it down make sure to press slowly and release and turn it around the die repeatedly until it is fully seated in properly. Once you are comfortable that the crystal is in place now you can move on to the bezel if you do have to install one.

To put the bezel on the new case you can use the crystal press, as you can use the nylon dies to push in the bezel, however you can just use your hands to do it. My personal preference is to use the press as it applies even pressure all around so the bezel is inserted properly but it is not necessary. Make sure before you do push the bezel you put the click spring back in place as it has two holes that match underneath and it should just fit right in those two notches. When you do press the bezel, you will hear a very audible click this indicates that the bezel has been installed, see if it turns clockwise properly then you can move on to the bezel insert.

Leave the bezel insert for now as you can put the dial in first so you can properly align the bezel insert with the dial. Now you need to remove the caseback from your old watch to remove the movement, with the dial and hands to transfer it to your new case.

For this I use the caseback remover that I received with the repair set from amazon. Simply align the tool with the notches on the SKX007 caseback and turn to the left to unscrew it.

*I prefer to remove the strap/bracelet first as it makes it easier to move and work on the watch.

Once you remove the caseback then you will have the automatic movement exposed, and before you can remove the movement you have to remove the stem. The stem is attached to the crown which is what you use to set the time and date of your watch. To remove the stem, simply unscrew the crown to its first position (Make sure the stem is not in the time setting or date setting position, as during that position the setting lever will not be accessible) and using your tweezers or a toothpick push down on the setting lever as the picture shows and pull out the stem as you are pushing down and it should come out relatively easily. If the rotor is above the setting lever, move it out of the way using a toothpick, or just turn the watch away from the stem and the rotor should rotate to the other side.

Now that the crown and stem is taken off turn the case around onto the gel cushion and take out the movement. If it seems to be stuck use a toothpick on the outer edge to loosen it out and then place it on the gel cushion. Now with the dial out simply place the new case over the dial and press it inside careful not to press over other components of the movement. Just press using the middle of the rotor as it is the safest option. Now place the stem inside the case and see if it is at the right size and if it is great you can move on to installing the caseback gasket, otherwise keep reading to adjust the stem and crown for the case.

Now when it is inside the case this is when you have to use the new stem and crown to manually adjust the size, as the stem you buy will be a lot longer than what is needed and so you will have to cut down and file as you eventually come down to the right size. The crown is simply screwed on the end of the stem. Hold the stem with some pliers or pin vice and make sure when you hold it is it by the thread and not towards the end of the stem. Screw in the crown place it back in and see how much you need to cut. Do not overestimate how much, instead do it bit by bit so you do not cut it too short by accident as in that case you will have to buy a new stem. Use a wire cutter to cut down the stem and file the end a little bit and see, once you get the perfect size where you are able to wind it in its first position and you are able to screw down back into the case without leaving a significant gap. Then you have to remove the stem again and unscrew the crown. This time however, you are not cutting down anymore or filing instead you are applying Loctite or threadlocker on the end of the stem where the crown meets, this is a definite measure of making sure the crown will never come off the stem. You only need a little bit, and then screw the crown back on wipe off the excess and leave it for a bit. Then put it back in the case into the movement, ensure everything works such as changing the time and day and date.

Now before installing the caseback you have to make sure that the caseback gasket is installed in the groove where the caseback meets the case. Before you install the rubber gasket you have to use silicon grease as this ensures that water cannot leak into your watch. There are two types you can buy either a greasing pad or the silicon grease individually, for convenience and ease buy the greasing pad as it is a lot easier and cleaner. Place the caseback gasket in the greasing pad turn the lid left and right quickly and then pull it out using the tweezers and in the groove for the case. Make sure it is in properly and then simply screw down the caseback and you are officially done.

Videos to watch (These videos essentially are build videos from scratch, they are a great watch if you are wanting to see each step in detail visually and a great learning tool):

Tools Needed:

Gloves, rubber or latex gloves, while gloves are really not necessary for this mod it is good practice to have them on:

A popular option is finger cots which you can get from here:

100 Pieces Rubber Finger Cots Elastic Guards Medium Size

Caseback Opener:

Caseback Opener from Amazon here.

Tweezers:

Tweezers from Amazon here.

Bergeon 7024 Anti Magnetic Tweezers #3

Watch Hand Remover:

Watch Hand Remover

Watch Hand Removing Pry Levers Pair

Tweezers for Hands Specifically:

Vetus® High Precision Tweezer with Carbon Fibre Tip

Bergeon 7026 Watch Hands Installing Tweezer

Rodico used for cleaning but can be used to install hands safely:

Bergeon 6033 Rodico Cleaning Putty

Hand Press Tool:

Stella Euro Watch Hand Press Inserting Tool

Hand Setting Tool (Set of 3)

Dial Protectors (You can use plastic sheets, bags whatever you can find really as long as it does not scratch the dial):

Bergeon 6938 Dial Protectors (Pack of 3)

Movement Holder:

SEIKO Movement Holder

Pliers (Any would do, just to pull the feet off the dials if necessary)

File (Any would do from a hardware store)

End Cutter(Any would do from a hardware store)

Pin Vice:

Double Ended Pin Vise and Collet Tool 0 to 1.0mm and 1.8 to 2.5mm

Loctite/Hypo Cement (you can just go to your local hardware store and buy any of the options they have as long as its purpose is to lock threaded fasterners):

Loctite Threadlocker 242 Blue 6 mL Medium Adhesive

Grease pad:

Watch Gasket O-Ring Lubricator Silicone Grease

Bergeon 7055 Lubri-Gaskets with Silicone Grease

Watchmakers Seiko Brand TSF451 Silicone Watch Grease

Crystal Press:

For this tool you can get either a very cheap option from eBay which was my first purchase and I would definitely not recommend it however your mileage may vary. These are some of the crystal presses that I would personally recommend.

Watch Press Set Watchmaker Tool 18-50mm Crystal Glass Back Case Closer

Watch Tool Crystal Press and Case Back Press with Nylon Dies

Optional:

Toothpick

Dust Blower (You can buy any cheap one you find, they all do the same job):

Economy Dust Blower Rubber 5 x 2 Inches

Loupe (while not necessary it is a good option to have to check if everything is in place correctly):

Bergeon 2611-TN Watchmaker Loupe with Opening

Magnifier Loupe with Headband for Watchmaking and Jewelry

Where to Buy Tools

SupplierWhat you can get
NamokimodsMajority of the tools you need and Bergeon variants
EsslingerThey only supply tools, they have everything you will need or think of for watchmaking including budget and more expensive variants
Crystal TimesMovement Holder
Lucius AtelierTweezers for hands, Movement holder and Springbar Tool
Dagaz WatchTimegrapher, Dust Blower and Case Knife
Watch Parts PlazaSpring bar tool, Link Remover, Case opener, Crystal press, Tweezers, Digital Caliper, Tweezers and Hammer
Uncle SeikoSpring bar tool, Screwdriver, Loupe, Pin Remover Tool
AmazonCan find a lot of tools here, especially the cheap watch repair pack that has a majority of the tools needed and comes at an affordable price.
eBaySimilar to Amazon you can find a lot of different tools from here, especially arguably one of the most affordable and best crystal press. Take caution and make sure that
AliexpressSimilar to eBay and Amazon you can find a lot of different tools from here, take caution as you can find a lot of the more expensive tools at a much cheaper price but that also means the quality will not be as high.
DIY Watch ClubRotor Screwdriver, Hand Installers, Case Knife, Rotico, Dial Protectors, Movement Holder, Finger Cots, Case Cushion (Also a Set that has a caseback opener, loupe with holder, finger cots, blower, hand removal and setting tool, pegwood, rodico, dial protecting sheets, case knife, hands measurement card, tweezer, and cleaning cloth)

Where to Buy Parts

SupplierWhat you can get
NamokimodsBezels, Bezel Inserts, Crystals, Hands, Crowns, Chapter Rings, Dials, Cases, Case Backs, Rotors, Movements, Click Spring, Gaskets, Bracelets & Straps
Lucius AtelierDials, Hands, Cases, Bezels, Crystal, Chapter Ring, Bezel Insert, Movements and Straps
DLW WatchesBezel Inserts, Bezels, Cases, Chapter Rings, Crowns, Crystals, Dials, Hands and Straps
DIY Watch ClubMovements, Bezel Inserts, Bezel, Chapter Ring, Hands, Dials, Cases and Watchmaking Kits (Includes everything needed to make one
6012 WatchesOEM Dials, OEM Cases and OEM Hands, Rotors, Casebacks and Rubber Straps
KomoworksDials
Mod ModeBezels, Bezel Inserts, Cases, Chapter Rings, Crowns, Crystals, Dials, Hands, Movements, Straps and Bracelets
CrystalTimesBezels, Bezel Inserts, Crystals, Hands, Crowns, Chapter Rings, Dials, Cases, Case Backs, Gaskets, Click Spring, Straps and Bracelets
Raffles TimeHands, Dial and Caseback
Harbour HorologyBezels, Bezel Insert, Case, Chapter Rings, Casebacks, Crystals, Dials and Hands
Long Island WatchesBezels, Bezel Inserts, Crystals, Hands, Chapter Rings, Dials, Cases, Casebacks, Bracelets & Straps
AjuiceTDials, Hands, Cases, Bracelets, Crystals, Chapter Rings, Bezel Inserts and Movements
Lumed CeramicLumed Ceramic Bezel Inserts
Watch modzBezels, Bezel Inserts, Cases, Casebacks, Chapter Rings, Crowns, Dials, Hands, Movements, Sapphire Crystals and Straps
TokeilabBezel Inserts, Dials, Chapter Rings, Hands and Cases
SeikomodsSapphire Crystals, Cases, Casebacks, Movements, Bezels, Bezel Inserts, Chapter Rings, Crowns, Dials, Hands, Gaskets, Bracelet and Straps
Yobokies
Bezels, Bezel Inserts, Bracelets, Chapter Rings, Dials, Hands and Crystals
Dagaz WatchDials, Crystals, Bezel Inserts, Chapter Rings, Hands, Straps, Cases, Casebacks, Gaskets,
WR Watches
Gaskets, Hands, Crystal, Caseback, Crown, Bezel, Strap/Bracelet, Dial, Cases and Chapter Rings
Uncle SeikoThe most popular place to get straps for Seiko and for good reason,
Strap CodeAnother popular choice for straps and bracelets
Watch and Style
Bezel Inserts, Bezels, Crystals, Chapter Rings, Dial, Crown, Hands, Cases, Casebacks, Movements, Straps, Gaskets, Day Wheels
DragonshroudShrouds, Hands, Chapter Rings, Dials, Bezel Insert, Crown
Watch Parts PlazaBezels, Bezel Inserts, Cases, Casebacks, Crowns, Crystals, Dials, Gaskets, Hands, Movements and Clickspring

You can only get OEM parts from here
SeikomodsaustraliaCases, Casebacks, Bezel, Click Spring, Bezel Insert, Crystal, Chapter Rings, Crowns, Gaskets and Movements
RedditFor secondhand parts, these can range from anything from tools to spare parts and mod parts. What is available is dependant entirely from what people have posted to sell.

Great Resources to Learn From or Gain Inspiration

r/seikomods

people post their builds so you can gain inspiration from and you can post any issue you are having and they are usually very helpful and quick to reply

LumeShot

Has posted a lot of builds that he has done, and his quality of videos and how he builds each one is just fun to watch

TheDubaiExpat

Has posted two notable builds on his channel, modding a Seiko 5 into a Rolex Submariner and modding a Seiko 5 into a Rolex GMT Master 2 very pleasant to watch and learn from as well.

Nisokies Nafokies

Posts a lot of modded watches and a great channel to gain inspiration from and learn

DIY Watch Club

They have small and short guides as to how to do mod certain parts and their instructions are clear and straight to the point

Conclusion

Remember just cause of the rating difficulty does not mean these mods are relatively quick and those YouTube videos even though some are relatively short if it is your first time or if you are being very careful and cautious it will take a while. There is no need to rush anything and take your time because the last thing you want to do is damage a part and having to buy a replacement for it. If you are comfortable with modding you can move on to experimenting with other movements such as the ETA 2824 or even the Valjoux 7750 chronograph movement or just buying scrap movements from eBay and taking them apart or trying to fix them. However, if you are just interested in modding your SKX007 or making your own mod then by all means go ahead it is entirely up to you.

The tools I have linked you can buy the cheaper options from Aliexpress or go down the route and start buying some more expensive variations of them namely the Bergeon or Horotec variations of these tools. However, it is not a requirement you buy the expensive tools you can still do the job with the cheaper tools but later down the line how reliable it will be and whether it holds up to the quality of the more expensive tools is where people draw the line. If you are just doing a one off mod or just seeing whether the hobby is for you then definitely get the cheaper tools, and if you realise that this is something you want to keep doing then slowly upgrade the tools as you go.

Let me know if I have missed anything or need to change something in this guide, I will do my best to keep the guide updated for as long as I can.

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